Trench Coats and Umbrellas

disney-archive:

want disney posts on your dash?
notorious-posts:

relatableposts:


You never want to run into any of these terrifying things in real life. If you did, you’d probably “nope” right out of there!


Omg this is too much!


I couldn’t get past #4…

dreamingariel:

"I HAVE CONQUERED"

(Source: superpringle, via pricklylegs)

mypatronusisrorypond:

redscudery:

saunteringvaguelydownwards:

decemberpaladin:

sizvideos:

Video

I love how she almost drops it until she smells it and that flashbulb memory hits.

“Real isn’t how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It’s a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real … Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.”

Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit

Notice she says “who” it was and not “what” it was.

Oh I just gotta snuggle my baby bear!

(via spiirel)

(Source: raven, via the-absolute-best-gifs)

theparisreview:

“All American fiction is young-adult fiction … to be an American adult has always been to be a symbolic figure in someone else’s coming-of-age story. And that’s no way to live. It is a kind of moral death in a culture that claims youthful self-invention as the greatest value. We can now avoid this fate. The elevation of every individual’s inarguable likes and dislikes over formal critical discourse, the unassailable ascendancy of the fan, has made children of us all. We have our favorite toys, books, movies, video games, songs, and we are as apt to turn to them for comfort as for challenge or enlightenment.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

All American fiction is young-adult fiction … to be an American adult has always been to be a symbolic figure in someone else’s coming-of-age story. And that’s no way to live. It is a kind of moral death in a culture that claims youthful self-invention as the greatest value. We can now avoid this fate. The elevation of every individual’s inarguable likes and dislikes over formal critical discourse, the unassailable ascendancy of the fan, has made children of us all. We have our favorite toys, books, movies, video games, songs, and we are as apt to turn to them for comfort as for challenge or enlightenment.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.